Rollins School of Public Health | Faculty Profile
Emory Rollins School of Public Health

Mark  Anderson

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Adjunct or Visiting, Global Health

Mark Anderson is currently the Active Branch Chief assigned to the Emergency Response and Recovery Branch (ERRB) in the Center for Global Health of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Prior to joining ERRB, he served as a Medical Officer and an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer in the Division of Violence Prevention in the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at CDC. Dr. Anderson received his B.A. from Franklin and Marshall College, his M.D. from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and his M.P.H. in Maternal and Child Health from the University of North Carolina School of Public Health. He has worked in complex humanitarian emergencies in West Africa, Israel, Jordan, Afghanistan, Bosnia, Kosovo, Liberia, Macedonia, Sri Lanka, Colombia, and Niger.

Education

  • Doctor of Medicine (MD) 1992, UNC School of Medicine
  • Master of Public Health (MPH) 1991, UNC School of Public Health
  • Bachelor of Arts 1983, Franklin and Marshall College
  • Preventive Medicine 1999, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Courses Taught

  • GH 512: Complex Humanit'n Emergencies

Affiliations & Activities

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Publications

  • , , Mental health survey among landmine survivors in Siem Reap province, Cambodia, Medicine, Conflict and Survival , ,
  • , , Prevalence of war-related mental health conditions and association with displacement status in postwar Jaffna district, Sri Lanka, JAMA, 306, 522-531
  • , , Sexual violence and its health consequences for female children in Swaziland: a cluster survey study, Lancet, ,
  • , , The Source of Firearms Used in School-Associated Violent Deaths: United States, 1992-1999, MMWR , 52, 169-172
  • , , Temporal Variations in School-Associated Student Homicide and Suicide Events: United States, 1992-1999 , MMWR , 50, 657-660
  • , , Regional variations in suicide rates: United States, 1990-1994, MMWR, 1997, 789-93.