News

Stopping Traffic: How Emory faculty, students, and advocates are confronting the complicated crisis of human trafficking, Spring 2017
BSHE PhD student, Leslie Munoz Johnson, was quoted in the Spring 2017 edition of Emory Magazine. The article touched on campus-wide efforts to study and combat human trafficking in Atlanta; Leslie spoke about her role as EGHI case competition chair and lead writer in researching the public health needs of victims. For access to article, please click here.

Some Melanoma Survivors Are Still Getting Too Much Sun Exposure, March 2017
Grace Crum Rollins Chair of Behavioral Sciences, Colleen McBride, Ph.D., was featured in a NPR article that notes some Melanoma survivors are still getting too much sun exposure. McBride explians, "There's an assumption that a cancer diagnosis provides a teachable moment when people are more willing to make positive changes, but whether it represents a true window of opportunity isn't well studied." For access to article, please click here.

Study finds effective interventions to prevent alcohol use among American Indian and rural youth, March 2017
Professor Kelli Komro was featured in a National Institutes of Helath (NIH) news release that focused on community-based and individual-level prevention strategies as effective ways to reduce alcohol use among American Indian and other youth living in rural communities. “Community organizing has been used effectively in multiple other health intervention trials and appeared to be an optimal strategy to engage diverse citizens in these multicultural communities,” explained Dr. Komro. For access to article, please click here.

How Monday resolutions can help you beat the odds, January 2017
Grace Crum Rollins Chair of Behavioral Sciences, Colleen McBride, Ph.D., was featured in an article highlighting the benefits of setting goals on Mondays. Research studies show Monday is the one day of the week people are most likely to set a new goal, like quitting smoking. "We should be saying, 'Hey, Monday is a new day.’ Try to do things differently this week. Try to make it that narrow. That may make it much more achievable.” For access to article, please click here.

Lifting depression among those with epilepsy, Fall 2016
Professor Nancy Thompson's Project Uplift (Using Practice and Learning to Increase Favorable Thoughts) was featured on the Rollins News website. The program is a groundbreaking distance-delivery intervention for people living with depression and seizures. Please click here to view article.

Virginia S. DeHaan Lecture on Health Promotion and Education, October 2016
The 2016 DeHaan Lecture featured Dr. David Satcher, 16th Surgeon General of the United States and Founding Director of the Satcher Health Leadership Institute at Morehouse School of Medicine. The title of his talk was, "The Journey from Health Disparity to Health Equity." For access to a recording of the lecture, please click here.

The Guardian and The Trace, October 2016
Research Professor, Alex Wagenaar, was recently quoted in The Guardian and The Trace discrediting the effectiveness of Scared Straight programs that aim to teach children about the harmful effects of gun violence.

Congratulations Students!

Leslie Munoz Johnson

Leslie Munoz Johnson

was selected for a Fogarty Global Health Fellowship funded by the National Institutes of Health.

As a part of her fellowship, Johnson will spend the better part of a year in India working on the mental health aspects of diabetes.

Kathleen Krause

Kathleen Krause

recently received an F-31 NRSA grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development 2016-2018 for her project, "Understanding the Disclosure of Sexual Violence (SV) among College Women."

Dana Williamson

Dana Williamson

Dana Williamson was selected as part of the inaugural cohort of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Health Policy Research Scholars.

Reuters | Researchers publish U.S. data on police-related injuries, July 2016
Professor Hannah Cooper, who recently addressed police violence as a public health issue, told Reuters Health it's important to "expand the national dialogue beyond death. Non-fatal injuries are also vital to the conversation and are much more common,” she said. “Better surveillance of police-related injuries is needed,” she added.

Nancy Thompson Wins 2016 Scholar/Teacher Award, May 2016
Called the "founding mother" of the Rollins School of Public Health, professor Nancy Thompson is honored for almost four decades of service to Emory. As a scholar, Thompson’s expertise ranges from asthma to organ donation to end-of-life care and beyond. She has produced more than 80 peer-reviewed articles, 10 book chapters, and a coauthored book titled “Demonstrating Your Program’s Worth: A Primer on Evaluation for Programs to Prevent Unintentional Injury,” which received a CDC Communications Roundtable Award. For more information please click here.

The Epilepsy Foundation of Colorado | Taryn's Story, April 2016

The Epilepsy Foundation of Colorado produced a video on a patient participating in Project UPLIFT, a distance-delivered depression management intervention developed by BSHE professor Nancy Thompson.

CNN | Public Health Experts: Decriminalize minor drug offenses, March 2016
Professor Hannah Cooper has been quoted about drug reform on CNN.com. Study finds that high incarceration rates and aggressive policing have increased risk of HIV, HCV and opioid overdose. Experts recommend many drug policy changes, including decriminalizing minor drug offenses.

JAMA Pediatrics | Long-Acting Reversible Contraception and Condom Use Among Female US High School Students; Implications for Sexually Transmitted Infection Prevention, March 2016
In collaboration with CDC colleagues, Riley Steiner, Jessica Sales and Andrea Swartzendruber, have published a study in JAMA Pediatrics that has been featured on 50 media outlets,: HealthDay, CNN, NBC News, Reuters Health, etc. Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) methods, namely IUDs and implants, offer a promising strategy for reducing unintended pregnancies among adolescents. However, these methods do not protect against sexually transmitted infections. Among this nationally representative sample of sexually active female high school students, LARC users were nearly 60 percent less likely to use condoms compared to students using oral contraceptives.

The Conversation | Bethany Caruso discuses the need to empower women through access to water, March 2016
In recognition of World Water Day (March 22) BSHE doctoral alum, Bethany Caruso, wrote an article for The Conversation addressing the need to empower women through access to water. Bethany conducted research in India, Bolivia, and Kenya on the water and sanitation challenges that women and girls confront and how these experiences influence their lives.

NPR | Carla Berg discuss connection between tobacco-related policy and how lawmakers view tobacco, January 2016
Carla Berg talks about the Rollins School of Public Health's studies delving into the connection between tobacco-related policy and how lawmakers view tobacco.

AJC Op-Ed, December 2015
Andrea Swartzendruber, a postdoctoral fellow in the Behavioral Sciences and Health Education Department at Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, takes on sex education in Georgia with an op-ed in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Sex ed is a course that ought to be health based, but often is influenced by politics and ideology.

Social Determinants of Health "Meet the Funder" Series, December 2015
Dr. Alonzo Plough, VP of Research-Evaluation-Learning and Chief Science Officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation was featured as part of the Social Determinants of Health "Meet the Funder" Series. Dr. Plough discussed RWJF’s Culture of Health Initiative.

James W. Curran Lecture on the Social Determinants of Health, November 2015
Dr. Ana V. Diez Roux, Distinguished University Professor of Epidemiology and Dean of the Drexel University School of Public Health, presented on "Reflections on the social determinants of health: opportunities and challenges for public health research and action".

Virginia DeHaan Lecture Series, October 2015
The 2015 DeHaan Lecture featured Dr. Nancy Krieger, professor of Social Epidemiology at Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Dr. Krieger discussed health inequities in their current and historical contexts, and drew on the eco social theory of disease distribution.

NPR | Sarah Piper speaks about Diabetes prevention, October 2015
Sarah Piper is the director of a lifestyle training program focusing on diabetes prevention at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health. Piper explained the statistics, how people can prevent diabetes, how to manage the disease and more during an interview on “Closer Look."

NPR | Carla Berg speaks about Teens using E-Cigarettes to Vape Marijuana, September 2015
A new study in the medical journal Pediatrics contains some eye-opening statistics about how teenagers are using e-cigarettes.

BSHE PhD Grad wins top Emory honor, May 2015
Through research and community service, Amanda Garcia-Williams has reached out to help others improve their physical and mental health, including extensive work on suicide prevention.

NPR | Ralph DiClemente speaks about sex ed on NPR, May 2015
At schools that offer comprehensive sex education, students tend to get the biology and the basics — but some public health researchers and educators are saying that's not enough. They're making the case that sex ed should include discussion about relationships, gender and power dynamics.

Carla Berg featured in Emory Public Health Magazine, Spring 2015
Carla Berg is trying to think like a tobacco executive. The associate professor in behavioral sciences and health education wants to borrow the sophisticated market segmentation techniques the tobacco industry has used so successfully for decades to lure smokers. Berg, however, plans to use them to identify young tobacco users and convince them to quit.

Colleen McBride featured in Emory Public Health Magazine, Spring 2015
When a research colleague asked Colleen McBride if she’d like to join him on a sailing trip along the Turkish coast, she accepted immediately. No matter that she did not know the other four people who were taking the trip. Or that she didn’t know how to sail. Or that she is prone to seasickness.